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Wellness Exams and Vaccinations

Wellness Exams and Vaccinations

Wellness Exams and Early Disease Detection Brochure

Vaccine Brochure

Annual wellness exams are critical to your pets continued good health. We regularly take ourselves to see doctors for eyes, teeth and general health. Your veterinarian is all of these to your pet and more. They are therapist, nutritionist, exercise trainer and surgeon. Think of it like “one-stop-shopping”. Your pets health, all in one place.

By taking your pet to their veterinarian each year until they are 7, and then twice a year after that you ensure that any medical problems will be seen early and can be preventable or treatable. Slow progression disease like tooth decay or eye degeneration can sneak up on your pet making life hard.


Tooth problems can be the start of more serious conditions like heart disease, serious blood infections and kidney failure, but its easy to stop this early. Since our pets live shorter lives than we do, disease can progress quickly and without appropriate immediate treatment, something initially simple could become life threatening.

Some breeds are predisposed to having certain health issues. Your veterinarian is aware of these conditions and can help prepare you for them by teaching prevention, management and treatment when they do arise.

When taking your pet for a wellness exam it is important to think of anything you need to ask questions about.

Has your dog suddenly started to have problems getting up in the morning?
Are you fetching the ball more than your dog?
Is your cat looking more like a watermelon than a lion?
Does your cat have you filling their water dish non stop and cleaning the litter box 20 times a day?

These could be early warning signs of diseases that need treatment.

Recommendations for Wellness Exams: Once yearly until 7 years-of-age and then bi-yearly after that.

Vaccines are the cornerstone to disease control. Every year animals become sick with transmittable diseases which can cause severe diarhhea, dehydration, aggression, vomiting, coughing and even death. Some of these diseases are zoonotic (meaning they can be transmitted to you). By vaccinating your dog or cat appropiately you can help them stay healthy and yourself. 

What is a vaccine? A preparation of weakened microorganisms given to create resistance to a disease

How is it given? It is administered by injection through a needle, by mouth and by aerosol

Why are vaccines necessary? Vaccines activate cells in your body to fight the virus. When it has been defeated the cells retain a memory of the virus so next time they will know how to fight off infection.

Recommended feline vaccines and their administration schedule:

Please take note that Shaw Pet Hospitals recommends having a veterinarian give all vaccines incase of underlying health issues. We examine all animals prior to giving any vaccine.

  • FVRCP: Feline herpesvirus (the cause of feline rhinotracheitis), feline calicivirus and feline parvovirus (the cause of panleukopenia).
  • Given at 8, 12 and 16 weeks. Boostered 1 year later and then every 3 years for life.
  • Feline Leukemia(felv): A retrovirus similar to Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This is only transmittable to other felines.
  • Given at 12 and 16 weeks and then yearly for all outside cats or indoor cats where there is more than 1 cat.
  • Rabies: A zoonotic (transmittable between humans and animals) disease. All mammals can carry rabies and it is usually fatal. It is passed through the saliva and is un-noticeable in the early stages. Once diagnosed a rabid animal must be euthanized.
  • Given at 16 weeks, then boostered 1 year later and then every 3 years for life.

Recommended canine vaccines and their administration schedule:

  • Rabies: A zoonotic (transmittable between humans and animals) disease. All mammals can carry rabies and it is usually fatal. It is passed through the saliva and is un-noticable in the early stages. Once diagnosed a rabid animal must be euthanized.
  • Given at 16 weeks, then boostered 1 year later and then every 3 years for life.
  • Da2ppl/c: Canine parvovirus, distemper, adenovirus, parainfluenza, coronavirus and leptospira.
  • Given at 8, 12 and 16 weeks. Boostered 1 year later and then every 3 years for life.
  • Bordetella: Also called Canine or Kennel Cough. An airborne organism that causes continual coughing for up to 3 weeks.
  • Given at 12 and 16 weeks and then boostered yearly for life
  • Lyme: Passed along by ticks, lyme disease can damage organs.
  • Give 12 and 16 weeks. Boostered 1 year later and then yearly for life.



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Shaw Pet Hospitals
1782 Stelly's Cross Road
Saanichton, BC V8M 1S8
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  • Phone: 250-652-4312
  • Fax: 250-652-4338
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